King’s College London, “Andrew Walker: A Celebration and Assessment” 24 May 2010, 10.30am to 4pm

Images

A car journey with Andrew Walker just over 4 years ago, resulted in Andrew encouraging me to apply to Kings College London for PhD research.  

Andrew's influence is immense and over such a wide period of time, across much of the UK church and beyond.  And like me there are so many stories of his impact in the lives of individuals.  Because of this I am all the more gutted to be away on 24th May and unable to attend this event in celebration of his life and work.

King’s College London
One-Day Conference

“Andrew Walker: A Celebration and Assessment”

24 May 2010, 10.30 to 4.00 - The Chapel, King’s College, Strand, London

King’s College London is pleased to announce a one-day conference to
celebrate the landmark work of Professor Andrew Walker, who recently retired
after a distinguished career at King’s. There is no charge for this conference,
which is open to all. Confirmed speakers include:

Professor Alister McGrath (KCL): Andrew Walker on C. S. Lewis, focussing
both on Walker’s assessment of Lewis as a theologian, and his development
of his approach through the “C. S. Lewis Centre” in the 1980s.
Professor William Abraham (Southern Methodist University, Dallas): “From
the Linear to the Prototypical: An Ecclesiology of the Third Article”. This paper
will explore the relations of Pentecostalism and Orthodoxy, a major interest for
Andrew Walker, offering a model of the church which combines the strengths
of both.

Dr Pete Ward (KCL): Andrew Walker and the “Gospel and Culture”
Movement. This will consider Walker’s significance in the Gospel and Culture
movement, noting his development of the approach of Lesslie Newbigin,
especially in Telling the Story and Enemy Territory.

Dr Luke Bretherton (KCL): “Sharing Peace: Class, Hierarchy and a
Doxological Vision of Social Relations”. Central to Andrew Walker's work is
an exploration of the interface between sociology and theology. This paper
picks up on this theme, particularly Walker's work on the trinity, to set out
a doxological account of inter-personal relations and how this contrasts
and interacts with the key sociological category of “class” and the differing
accounts of social relations that shape conceptualisations of class.

Alister McGrath
Head, Center for Theology, Religion and Culture
Professor of Theology, Ministry, and Education
King’s College London