Can Christians ever speak up in public in secular europe?

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On the 24th October, Joel Edwards, general director of the Evangelical Alliance UK, spoke on BBC Radio 4's 'Thought for the Day', on the issue of abortion, that is currently being debated by our medical profession and government (driven amongst other things by the medical advances allowing premature babies, born earlier than the legal limit for termination, to survive).

I thought Joel was sensitive, nuanced, and at the same time probing with a question as the volume of abortions currently practiced. You can read the full text of what he said here.

I must admit I was surprised that the BBC allowed a topic like this without discussion. But what troubled me the most was the vitriolic reaction of so much of the public, that Radio 4 broadcast earlier this week. Whilst there were concerns like my own, the principle objection seemed to be that as a christian he is automatically disqualified from sharing his opinions.

The notion that a christian who speaks on any issue such as this is automatically and axiomatically a 'religious fundamentalist', reminded me that in the UK the real dominant fundamentalist religion of secular liberalism is alive and well, and that in the name of its chief tenant 'tolerance', it wants to exlude anyone of faith from having a voice/opinion.

If I have met someone who is a reasonable, moderate and thoughtful as a christian, it's Joel Edwards. Joel has been appointed to the UK governments Equality and Human Rights Commission. Non christians, have ceased on his radio broadcast to bolster their disgust that a christian would be given this appointment.

You can read what the UK National Secular Society, accuse Joel of being, as a Christian. In particular they say he comes to the job with a 'pre-formed' agenda, that disqualifies him from the role. Revealing the myth that they think they don't bring their own!

Amazing that secularist, atheist non christians continue to practice their religion with the same bile, animosity, hatred, and ignorance as the reliigous believers they caricature.

Oh for some humble thoughtful and gracious atheists and secularists. I'm sure they exist but for now the UK is held sway by religious fundamentalism of a different kind.